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Seattle

   2014    Art
Dave Grohl returns to his musical roots, while the Foo Fighters prepare to record at Seattle's Robert Lang Studio with Death Cab for Cutie's Benjamin Gibbard. Dave sets his focus on the Seattle music scene, mainly the grunge movement and its implications in American Rock Music. Interviews with Chris Cornell, Nancy Wilson, Bruce Pavitt.
Series: Sonic Highways

New York

   2014    Art
The last episode of the series talks about the most important city in the States. Stories that go from the early 40s until today. Interviews with Rick Rubin, Emmylou, Chris Martin, LL Cool J and Barack Obama. And a real statement about what is happening with the studios business nowadays. The song 'I Am A River' is recorded during this episode.
Series: Sonic Highways

Elvis Presley: The Searcher Part Two

   2018    History
The second part of this series begins with his return home after his discharge from the army, and how he dealt with a rapidly changing pop scene.
The picture is more complicated than even a fairly serious Elvis fan may understand. Priscilla Presley, who made some appearances in the first part, offers much more here, helping us understand how being forced into making a string of lousy movies was one kind of artistic prison, and then being ensconced in casino hotels for his famous Las Vegas residency was another. The man who had so carefully created his original persona was now stuck in the shallow roles others forced him to play.
Series: Elvis Presley: The Searcher

Southern Patagonia

   2020    Culture
Episode 3 continues to show the obstacles faced with charging electric bikes in remote places, but Ewan McGregor and Charley Boorman start to learn and evolve their process. The risk of cold temperatures is high but they bravely do it anyway. The duo is having a hard time of it out there but, thankfully, the scenery is absolutely stunning. Heading through Patagonia, Ewan and Charley stay at an eco-lodge in one of the world’s remotest areas with people that live off the grid.
Series: Long Way Up

Words on a Page

   2020    History
Writing itself is 5,000 years old, and for most of that time words were written by hand using a variety of tools. The Romans were able to run an empire thanks to documents written on papyrus. Scroll books could be made quite cheaply and, as a result, ancient Rome had a thriving written culture. With the fall of the Roman Empire, papyrus became more difficult to obtain. Europeans were forced to turn to a much more expensive surface on which to write: Parchment. Medieval handwritten books could cost as much as a house, they also represent a limitation on literacy and scholarship.
No such limitations were felt in China, where paper had been invented in the second century. Paper was the foundation of Chinese culture and power, and for centuries how to make it was kept secret. When the secret was out, paper mills soon sprang up across central Asia. The result was an intellectual flourishing known as the Islamic Golden Age. Muslim scholars made discoveries in biology, geology, astronomy and mathematics. By contrast, Europe was an intellectual backwater.
That changed with Gutenberg’s development of movable type printing. The letters of the Latin alphabet have very simple block-like shapes, which made it relatively simple to turn them into type pieces. When printers tried to use movable type to print Arabic texts, they found themselves hampered by the cursive nature of Arabic writing. The success of movable type printing in Europe led to a thousand-fold increase in the availability of information, which produced an explosion of ideas that led directly to the European Scientific Revolution and the Industrial Revolution that followed.
Series: The Secret History of Writing

Changing the Script

   2020    History
The written word is so important in everyday life that there can be few more radical acts than forcing an entire nation to learn a new script. Yet that is what happened in Turkey in 1928 when Mustafa Kemal decreed that the Arabic script would be replaced by the letters of the Latin alphabet. Communication with computers using human language is usually made with Latin letters. This is how most Chinese people interact with their computers and smart phones, using a Latin-based phonetic script called Pinyin. As a result, even highly educated Chinese are losing the ability to write using Chinese characters. Could what is happening in China be the future of writing everywhere?
Series: The Secret History of Writing
Planet Earth
Planet Earth

   2007    Nature
A History of Christianity
A History of Christianity

   2011    History
Five Came Back
Five Came Back

   2017    Art
Space Race
Space Race

   2005    Technology
Cosmos: Possible Worlds
Cosmos: Possible Worlds

   2020    Science
Leaving Neverland
Leaving Neverland

   2019    Culture
Life of a Universe
Life of a Universe

   2017    Science
Ice Age Giants
Ice Age Giants

   2013    Science